Avaricious and Envious


TWO neighbours came before Jupiter and prayed him to grant their hearts’ desire.
Now the one was full of avarice, and the other eaten up with envy. So to punish
them both, Jupiter granted that each might have whatever he wished for himself,
but only on condition that his neighbour had twice as much. The Avaricious man
prayed to have a room full of gold. No sooner said than done; but all his joy was
turned to grief when he found that his neighbour had two rooms full of the precious
metal. Then came the turn of the Envious man, who could not bear to think that hia
neighbour had any joy at all. So he prayed that he might have one of his own eyes
put out, by which means his companion would become totally blind.

“VICES ARE THEIR OWN PUNISHMENT.”

the Labourer and the Nightingale.


A Labourer lay listening to a Nightingale’s song throughout the summer night. So pleased was he with it that the next night he set a trap for it and captured it. “Now that I have caught thee,” he cried, “thou shalt always sing to me.” “We Nightingales never sing in a cage.” said the bird. “Then I’ll eat thee.” said the Labourer. “I have always heard say that a nightingale on toast is dainty morsel.” “Nay, kill me not,” said the Nightingale; “but let me free, and I’ll tell thee three things far better worth than my poor body.” The Labourer let him loose, and he flew up to a branch of a tree and said: “Never believe a captive’s promise; that’s one thing. Then again: Keep what you have. And third piece of advice is: Sorrow not over what is lost forever.” Then the song-bird flew away